Typology of bullying behaviours

With some variations, the following typology of workplace bullying behaviours has been adopted by a number of academic researchers. The typology uses five different categories.

  1. Threat to professional status – including belittling opinions, public professional humiliation, accusations regarding lack of effort, intimidating use of discipline or competence procedures.
  2. Threat to personal standing – including undermining personal integrity, destructive innuendo and sarcasm, making inappropriate jokes about the target, persistent teasing, name calling, insultsintimidation.
  3. Isolation – including preventing access to opportunities, physical or social isolation, withholding necessary information, keeping the target out of the loop, ignoring or excluding.
  4. Overwork – including undue pressure, impossible deadlines, unnecessary disruptions.
  5. Destabilisation – including failure to acknowledge good work, allocation of meaningless tasks, removal of responsibility, repeated reminders of blunders, setting target up to failshifting goal posts without telling the target.

On this article there is also a list of tactics, a couple of them listed are:

Encouraged people to turn against the person being tormented (55%).

Started, or failed to stop, destructive rumours or gossip about the person (56%).

Disregarded satisfactory or exemplary quality of completed work despite evidence (discrediting) (58%).

Equal Opportunity, and Equity mean something.

No one has the right to sabotage you at your workplace.

Workplace bullying is a persistent pattern of mistreatment from others in the workplace that causes either physical or emotional harm. It can include such tactics as verbalnonverbalpsychologicalphysical abuse and humiliation. This type of workplace aggression is particularly difficult because, unlike the typical school bully, workplace bullies often operate within the established rules and policies of their organization and their society. In the majority of cases, bullying in the workplace is reported as having been done by someone who has authority over the victim. However, bullies can also be peers, and occasionally subordinates.[1]

Research has also investigated the impact of the larger organizational context on bullying as well as the group-level processes that impact on the incidence and maintenance of bullying behaviour.[2] Bullying can be covert or overt. It may be missed by superiors; it may be known by many throughout the organization. Negative effects are not limited to the targeted individuals, and may lead to a decline in employee morale and a change in organizational culture.[3] It can also take place as overbearing supervision, constant criticism, and blocking promotions.[4]

Workplace bullying is a persistent pattern of mistreatment from others in the workplace that causes either physical or emotional harm. It can include such tactics

as verbalnonverbalpsychologicalphysical abuse and humiliation. This type of workplace aggression is particularly difficult because, unlike the typical school bully, workplace bullies often operate within the established rules and policies of their organization and their society. In the majority of cases, bullying in the workplace is reported as having been done by someone who has authority over the victim. However, bullies can also be peers, and occasionally subordinates.[1]

Research has also investigated the impact of the larger organizational context on bullying as well as the group-level processes that impact on the incidence and maintenance of bullying behaviour.[2] Bullying can be covert or overt. It may be missed by superiors; it may be known by many throughout the organization. Negative effects are not limited to the targeted individuals, and may lead to a decline in employee morale and a change in organizational culture.[3] It can also take place as overbearing supervision, constant criticism, and blocking promotions.[4]

Equal Opportunity, and Equity mean something. Human Rights and the right to a just and favorable workplace means something.

Those who cannot hold their self accountable professionally have no place in a supervisory role. Leadership who refuse to hold others accountable to a culture that is conducive to the highest success of all is no leadership at all.

The prevalence of a hostile work environment varies by industry. In 2015, the broad industry category with the highest prevalence was healthcare and social assistance 10%.[28] According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 16,890 workers in the private industry experienced physical trauma from nonfatal workplace violence in 2016.

The prevalence of hostile work environment varies by occupation. In 2015, the occupation groups with the highest prevalence was protective services (24%) and community and social services (15%).[29]

The prevalence of hostile work environment varies by occupation. In 2015, the occupation groups with the highest prevalence was protective services (24%) and community and social services (15%).[29]

Based on research by H. Hoel and C.L. Cooper, most perpetrators are supervisors.

Organizational culture

Bullying is seen to be prevalent in organizations where employees and managers feel that they have the support, or at least the implicit blessing of senior managers to carry on their abusive and bullying behaviour.[3] Furthermore, new managers will quickly come to view this form of behaviour as acceptable and normal if they see others get away with it and are even rewarded for it.[33]

When bullying happens at the highest levels, the effects may be far reaching. People may be bullied irrespective of their organizational status or rank, including senior managers, which indicates the possibility of a negative domino effect, where bullying may cascade downwards, as the targeted supervisors might offload their own aggression onto their subordinates. In such situations, a bullying scenario in the boardroom may actually threaten the productivity of the entire organisation.[34]

The workplace bully is often expert at knowing how to work the system. They can spout all the current management buzzwords about supportive management but use it as a cover. By keeping their abusive behaviour hidden, any charges made by individuals about his or her bullying will always come down to your word against theirs. They may have a kiss up kick down personality, wherein they are always highly cooperative, respectful, and caring when talking to upper management but the opposite when it comes to their relationship with those whom they supervise.[37] Bullies tend to ingratiate themselves to their bosses while intimidating subordinates.[38][39] They may be socially popular with others in management, including those who will determine their fate. Often, a workplace bully will have mastered kiss up kick down tactics that hide their abusive side from superiors who review their performance.[40]

As a consequence of this kiss up kick down strategy:[41]

  • A bully’s mistakes are always concealed or blamed on underlings or circumstances beyond their control
  • A bully keeps the target under constant stress
  • A bully’s power base is fear, not respect
  • A bully withholds information from subordinates and keeps the information flow top-down only
  • A bully blames conflicts and problems on subordinate’s lack of competence, poor attitude, or character flaws
  • A bully creates an unnatural work environment where people constantly walk on eggshells and are compelled to behave in ways they normally would not

We have laws and definitions for a reason. Abuse is prohibited for a reason. Everyone has a right to freedom and to be free from harassment and abuse.

Abusive workplace behaviours

According to Bassman, common abusive workplace behaviours are:[49]

  1. Disrespecting and devaluing the individual, often through disrespectful and devaluing language or verbal abuse
  2. Overwork and devaluation of personal life (particularly salaried workers who are not compensated)
  3. Harassment through micromanagement of tasks and time
  4. Over evaluation and manipulating information (for example concentration on negative characteristics and failures, ****** setting up subordinate for failure).
  5. Managing by threat and intimidation
  6. Stealing credit and taking unfair advantage
  7. Preventing access to opportunities
  8. Downgrading an employee’s capabilities to justify downsizing
  9. Impulsive destructive behaviour

According to Hoel and Cooper, common abusive workplace behaviours are:[50]

  1. Ignoring opinions and views
  2. Withholding information in order to affect the target’s performance
  3. Exposing the target to an unmanageable workload
  4. Giving tasks with unreasonable or impossible targets or deadlines
  5. Ordering the target to do work below competence
  6. Ignoring or presenting hostility when the target approaches
  7. Humiliation or ridicule in connection with work
  8. Excessive monitoring of a target’s work (see micromanagement)
  9. Spreading gossip
  10. Insulting or making offensive remarks about the target’s person (i.e. habits and background), attitudes, or private life
  11. Removing or replacing key areas of responsibility with more trivial or unpleasant tasks.

Abusive cyberbullying in the workplace can have serious socioeconomic and psychological consequences on the victim. Workplace cyberbullying can lead to sick leave due to depression which in turn can lead to loss of profits for the organisation.

Workplace mobbing

Main article: Workplace mobbing

Workplace mobbing overlaps with workplace bullying. The concept originated from the study of animal behaviour. It concentrates on bullying by a group.

Be sure and visit the article to review all the :

Personality disorders and dysfunctional personality characteristics…..

such as:

Psychopathy

Main article: Psychopathy in the workplace

Narcissism, lack of self-regulation, lack of remorse and lack of conscience have been identified as traits displayed by bullies. These traits are shared with psychopaths, indicating that there is some theoretical cross-over between bullies and psychopaths.[81] Bullying is used by corporate psychopaths as a tactic to humiliate subordinates.[82] Bullying is also used as a tactic to scare, confuse and disorient those who may be a threat to the activities of the corporate psychopath[82] Using meta data analysis on hundreds of UK research papers, Boddy concluded that 36% of bullying incidents were caused by the presence of corporate psychopaths. According to Boddy there are two types of bullying:[83]

  • Predatory bullying – the bully just enjoys bullying and tormenting vulnerable people for the sake of it.
  • Instrumental bullying – the bullying is for a purpose, helping the bully achieve their goals.

No one has the right to bully or abuse others. If someone is borderline, or psychotic, or a psychopath, they must be dealt with and held accountable to learn that such behavior is against the social standards that are designed to protect all in freedom. Bullying is psychotic behavior by someone who is mentally ill and needs psychological therapies. Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone will need a day of grace. But persistent, unrelenting, aggressive, unrepentant, willful, intentional, prolonged bullying and harassment is not a “mistake”, or a “bad day”. It is a serious form of abuse that is destructive, harmful and punishable by law.

I have had to endure the most incredible bullying, abuse, both emotional and physical, at this job with Stanislaus county for over a year.

Say what you will about Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Workplace_bullying — you may search up all these links to verify the information extracted from them. Feel free to visit each article of study and research by professionals and verify the information about bullying.

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